Students support Pfizer booster roll-out

Students support Pfizer booster roll-out

Following the FDA's authorization of a Pfizer booster shot for certain vulnerable Americans, students share their opinions on getting a third dose and what this means for the ongoing pandemic.
Published: October 10, 2021 | Updated: October 11th, 2021 at 2:49 pm
Alternative Text
Jasmine Murray receives her Johnson & Johnson vaccine in April 2021 at a vaccine clinic in Syracuse.

Following the FDA’s Sept. 22 approval of at-risk Americans to receive a Pfizer COVID-19 booster shot, over 60 million Americans became eligible to receive a third dose, according to NPR. At-risk groups include those 65 years and older, individuals 49-64 with medical conditions that put them at greater risk for the disease, and people working in high-risk settings such as schools and hospitals. 

Although the booster has only been approved for groups who received the Pfizer shot, the FDA is slated to meet next week to review data regarding boosters for those who took the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson shots. Students have voiced their support for the rollout of boosters for vulnerable groups, and some said they hope in the coming months a third dose will become available to the general public. 

The interviews and photos below were collected by Cross-Media News Writing students on-campus during the first week of October to gauge student reaction to the rollout of booster shots and what this means for the ongoing pandemic. 

Alternative Text

“I’m not concerned [about the booster] because I know what rNA vaccines are. I’ve done a lot of reading and research on them. I’m not concerned because I’m informed. But I can see why some people might be because they read fake news, or they’re misinformed, or they’re biased.” — Biology and policy studies freshman Madison Stead

Alternative Text

“I plan to get the booster shot to not only protect the students around me but also because while currently being in school, having the virus would be an inconvenience in terms of keeping up with my studies” — Communication and rhetorical studies sophomore Colin Connolly

Alternative Text

“I think there’s a vaccine equity issue that’s happening right now so, I think that it’s a smart decision to prioritize that population and try to get the vaccine to other less fortunate people.”

— Newhouse doctoral student Adriana Mucezola

“I think the CDCs’ recent decision was the right choice. I’m really excited for this booster to become a mass product for everyone. I think it’s really important for our community and is a step in the right direction for society to go back to normal. I know right now it’s limited but when everyone here at Syracuse is able to get it I think it will really make a difference.”

— Whitman sophomore Jamie Mager

 

Alternative Text
Alternative Text

“I feel like it's a step in the right direction. I feel like right now everyone's kind of in a lot of stress over protection, and I won't necessarily complain about extra protection.” — Public health senior Lewis Fraizer

Alternative Text

“Once I’m eligible to get the vaccine I'll probably be first in line to take it … I think my grandparents would definitely also take it just because they are in the high-risk category so I think they’ll also be first in line for that.” — Broadcast digital journalism freshman Ari Feinstein

“On a global scale, it would be nice for them to work together with other countries to a protect as many people as possible and stop the spread. And I think that’s only possible when we grow as a global community.”

— Clinical mental health graduate student Aaishanni Aguy

Alternative Text
Alternative Text

“I hope that more people will be more comfortable getting the vaccine that haven’t already, because I think that is the most important factor that should be discussed as of right now… I just think that it keeps everyone safe, especially when there are so many unknown factors right now.” 

— Communication and rhetorical studies junior Abigail Meyer