hydrofracking

December 1, 2012 - 1:35pm
More than 160 people attended the event, which was part of a debate series sponsored by the Campbell Public Affairs Institute.

The debate about whether New York state should allow hydraulic fracturing continues—and on Friday evening, it came to Syracuse University.

Students, faculty and community members filled Maxwell Auditorium to watch four experts argue whether hydraulic fracturing causes more harm than good, as part of the debate series sponsored by the Maxwell School’s Campbell Public Affairs Institute.

November 3, 2012 - 10:55am
While sampling water in New York's Southern Tier, Syracuse and ESF students had a chance to meet some of the people who could benefit the most from their data: New York landowners.

Tucked into a sleeping bag on the top of a hill in southern New York, Egan Waggoner watched as a stream of meteors flashed across the dark sky. A landowner had allowed Waggoner and his teammates to stay the night in her backyard in return for having her well’s water tested earlier that day. The next morning, he rose and roused the others after the family had gone to church, and they continued on to the next well. 

September 26, 2012 - 9:00pm
Jack Ramsden's life dedication is to spread the news about hydrofracking and other environmental issues in Central New York.

If you Google “hydrofracking lease maps in Onondaga County,” the first link will bring you to a map that looks as if it’s stained with dried blood. The drips and drabs congregate mostly in Skaneateles, Marcellus, Onondaga, Spafford, Otisco and Tully, but slowly creep higher into other parts of Central New York.

September 24, 2012 - 10:10am
Just a mile off campus, Westcott Street came alive on Sunday as the neighborhood's annual cultural fair ushered in artists, performers, restaurants and visitors from the surrounding area.

The 21st annual Westcott Street Cultural Fair awakened the surrounding neighborhood on Sunday, welcoming thousands of people of various ages and ethnicities to celebrate Westcott's diversity. 

The fair is a volunteer-driven effort organized by the Westcott Area Cultural Coalition, and the planning, “never stops,” Sharon Sherman, chair and treasurer of WACC, said. “It’s to celebrate this neighborhood,” she said. “I just like to see people happy, and with the fair, you see people from different walks of life coming together that I wouldn’t expect.”

September 16, 2012 - 5:34pm
Hundreds attended the Water Is Life music festival on Saturday Sept. 15, where performers and speakers stressed the importance of unifying as a community to fight hydraulic fracturing.

At the Water Is Life music festival on Saturday, Sept. 15, the event's energy didn’t just come from the musicians’ and speaker’s anti-hydofracking messages; it also came from the feeling of community that the event generated.