global warming

May 12, 2017 - 5:00pm
SU students from across the country represent the United States' divided perceptions of climate change.

For Eric King, learning about climate change for the first time was a confusing experience. His eighth grade science class in Columbus, Ohio, was taught two different theories: First, that the changes in weather patterns were part of the natural rhythms of the Earth and not connected to human actions, and second, that climate change was a consequence of greenhouse gas emissions and other human activities. 

 “At the end people walked out saying ‘well no one really knows what’s going on,’” the magazine journalism senior said.

October 22, 2013 - 7:18pm
The world is warming -- and scientists are confident that humans are at least partially to blame. So Dan Grossman wonders why aren't we doing anything about it?

Last week, Dan Grossman, a George Foster Peabody Award-winning journalist addressed my class for a guest lecture. He posed a very blunt, striking question: Why aren’t we doing anything about global warming?

October 10, 2012 - 7:48pm
350.org founder Bill McKibben spoke at Hendricks Chapel Wednesday night about global climate change.

Bill McKibben started his lecture with a joke.

“The Dalai Lama is a hard act to follow,” he said, garnering some laughter from the crowd.

But McKibben was greeted with a sea of audience members who packed into Hendricks Chapel Wednesday night at 7:30 p.m. to see him speak as part of the first Syracuse University 2012-13 University Lectures series.

April 19, 2010 - 2:17pm
Green ways think, drink, and do your laundry on Earth Day.

In honor of the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, The NewsHouse presents Earth Day videos featuring two fun, easy ways to be greener, and a closer look at how much Syracuse University students really know about environmental issues. 

 

April 19, 2010 - 2:07pm
SU students show their (lack of) knowledge about environmental issues.

Imagine Syracuse University 50 years from now, under 10 feet of water — waves sloshing up the sides of the Carrier Dome, desk chairs and tables rushing past E.S. Bird Library, students backstroking down Marshall Street.  It’s a nightmarishly wet future for SU. But one that will become increasingly real if unmitigated global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions continue to rise over the next half century, bringing the planet closer and closer to the point of irreversible change.