education

October 15, 2014 - 11:21pm
All Syracuse young children to receive books every month.

With the support of the city of Syracuse, the Literacy Coalition of Onondaga County received $50,000 from the Common Council on Monday to expand a childhood literacy program. The coalition’s executive director Ginny Carmody said this has been the goal of the program since its inception four years ago.

“We’ve always wanted to provide books to every child in the city,” she said.

March 27, 2014 - 1:42am
The former Congressman from Texas and presidential candidate discussed national issues to a sold-out audience at Hendricks Chapel.

Former U.S. Rep. and Republican candidate for president Ron Paul spoke at Hendricks Chapel Wednesday night about many issues, but heavily emphasized individual liberty.

“The answer isn’t in more government, the answer is for more liberty for individuals to take care of themselves,” Paul said.

April 7, 2013 - 5:31pm
The food and drink tasting event drew large crowds to the Museum of Science and Technology even during the SU Final Four game against Michigan.

If you weren't watching the Syracuse-Michigan basketball game and needed something else to do on Saturday night besides spill beer on your orange Final Four T-shirt or shout “Go Cuse!” at a bar's TV, "Tap into the MOST" at the Museum of Science and Technology was definitely the best way to spend your night. 

February 20, 2013 - 8:07pm
A group of Honors students check out Aikido of Central New York for an evening of education and empowerment.

Samurai warriors in kimonos, high kicks soaring through the air, swooshing limbs: all stereotypical images that flash when one thinks of Japanese martial arts. Aim for the kill and -- KA-POW!

A group of Syracuse University students swapped stereotypes for reality though when they visited Aikido of CNY this week and got a crash course in the martial arts.

May 18, 2012 - 6:42am
Educators and students from Syracuse to California joined a live Twitter chat this spring about social media in the classroom.

Social media has emerged as a dominant force in society. Everywhere we turn there are examples of sites like Twitter and Facebook being used in new and innovative ways.

How is this affecting how teachers teach and how students learn?

Are social media tools being utilized to their fullest potential?

September 24, 2010 - 11:08pm
Actress Reenah L. Golden uses her experience as a teaching artist to help her perform 16 roles in "No Child..." -- Syracuse Stage's 38th season opener.

If there’s one thing you can say about actress Reenah L. Golden, it’s that she doesn’t take things for granted. Take the moment she was offered the main role for a Rochester production of the one-woman play, No Child… by Nilaja Sun. 

August 24, 2010 - 11:49pm
Alexander Williams, a graduate student from Ghana, has managed to overcome the obstacles inherent to being blind.

Alexander Williams was always a curious child. One day, his curiosity got him into trouble.

At age 12, Williams was hit in the right eye by a stray bullet.  Warring factions in the part of Liberia where he lived for the first 12 years of his life were fighting over port access to the harbor when his house got caught in the crossfire. 

April 6, 2010 - 11:14pm
Children's advocate Marian Wright Edelman stresses the importance of equal access to education for underprivileged youth.

Policies and institutions that neglect youth are creating a cradle-to-prison pipeline that threatens to swallow a generation and weaken the nation, said children’s advocate Marian Wright Edelman.

October 21, 2009 - 11:39pm
Health educator Scott Fried delivers a frank talk on sexual relationships and protecting yourself from HIV/AIDS.

“I need you all to stay awake. If you fall asleep you’ll really miss out on something great.”

Perched on the edge of the Goldstein Auditorium stage Wednesday night, Scott Fried began his talk to 250 Syracuse University students with that opening line. 

Fried was infected with HIV in 1987. The national public speaker and health educator has made it his mission for the past 18 years to help others protect themselves from the disease. 

September 9, 2009 - 7:34pm
About 1,000 students and locals pack Goldstein Auditorium to hear the Vice President discuss college affordability.

At 10:35 a.m., an official looking man came to the podium, rattled around some papers, and walked off. The crowd quieted down and the jazz music coming from the speakers of Goldstein Auditorium became audible. Realizing that the scheduled program was only five minutes behind schedule, the chit-chat in the room resumed.

The Vice President of the United States is allowed to be late.