climate change

May 12, 2017 - 5:00pm
SU students from across the country represent the United States' divided perceptions of climate change.

For Eric King, learning about climate change for the first time was a confusing experience. His eighth grade science class in Columbus, Ohio, was taught two different theories: First, that the changes in weather patterns were part of the natural rhythms of the Earth and not connected to human actions, and second, that climate change was a consequence of greenhouse gas emissions and other human activities. 

 “At the end people walked out saying ‘well no one really knows what’s going on,’” the magazine journalism senior said.

November 4, 2015 - 10:24am
In the last University Lecture of 2015, Klein urged students to continue to act as part of a global network of social justice.

By November, the fear of imminent and endless snow weighs heavily on everyone’s mind in Syracuse. No surprise than that the uncharacteristically balmy 70-degree weather Tuesday delighted most students.

But for author and environmentalist Naomi Klein, this delightful weather only further proved the perturbing and unabated rise in temperature associated with climate change.

“This is the warmest early November weather recorded in 38 years,” Klein said in her opening remarks. “Right now, 2015 is shaping up to be the warmest year recorded, just as 2014 was the year previously.”

September 23, 2014 - 1:58pm
Hundreds of SU and SUNY-ESF students marched alongside more than 300,000 other demonstrators in New York City at the largest climate change march ever.

At the People’s Climate March, students from Syracuse University and SUNY-ESF called for their universities to stop investing in fossil fuels, as well as other ways to make their campuses more sustainable.

December 4, 2013 - 9:47pm
Joe Stelling of New York Public Interest Research Group on climate change: it “is a real thing.”

On Wednesday night, environmentalist Joe Stelling declared the existence of climate change and advocated that clean energy was the solution.

Stelling, New York Public Interest Research Group’s environmental campaign organizer, told a small group of students that climate change “is a real thing.”

“The bottom line is experts agree. It’s real, and we are driving the problem. It is driven by greenhouse gases,” Stelling said.

October 22, 2013 - 7:18pm
The world is warming -- and scientists are confident that humans are at least partially to blame. So Dan Grossman wonders why aren't we doing anything about it?

Last week, Dan Grossman, a George Foster Peabody Award-winning journalist addressed my class for a guest lecture. He posed a very blunt, striking question: Why aren’t we doing anything about global warming?